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Wednesday, February 25, 2009

MODULE 6 AND ASSIGNMENT 6

Complete either the telephone quiz or the alternative assignment. If you want to practice for the telephone quiz, use Wimba.

Please post any questions that you have.

8 comments:

Jami said...

How do you use Much/Many/More in a sentence?

Veronica Baig said...

Use "much" before a noncount noun and "many" before a count noun: e.g. There is much information available on the Internet, or There are many news items available on the Internet. You can use "more" with either of these words: e.g. There is much more information available on the Internet now than 5 years ago, or There are many more news items available ...
A count noun is one you can put numbers in front of--one apple, two apples, etc.
A noncount is one you can't count--rice. The only way to count it is to put some measure in front of the word--grains/cups/bags of rice.

Jami said...

Also what do you do with the word "very"? "I love you so very much" or "I love you so very much more..."

Veronica Baig said...

The word "very" is an adverb; it's also an intensifier (it intensifies the word following it). You can use it in positive sentences such as your examples. In these sentences, however, "much" is not a quantifier before a noun. With "so very much more ..." you have the start of a comparative--"so very much more than something".

jami said...

Workbook, Pg.43,Practice 3, Q. 11 :

"The furniture in those rooms (is/are) comfortable."
I chose "are" but the book says "is". I figured that "furniture" is a noncount word and that in this context it is plural or referring to many pieces of furniture; because of being more than one, I figured "are" would be used.

Veronica Baig said...

Even though noncount nouns usually contain many components--when we say "furniture" we do think of more than one piece of furniture--it is treated as a singular. For that reason use a singular verb and refer to it with a singular pronoun.

Veronica Baig said...

I came up with an example that falls into the same situation, and I am still confused.
"The sheep on the hills (is/are) cute." I figure sheep is another noncount but being used in a plural sense so "are" would be chosen but by the book's reasoning it would seem that "is" would be the answer. What's going on here?

Veronica Baig said...

The problem here is that "sheep" is not a noncount noun--it's simply an irregular plural. The plural and the singular forms are the same. Think about it--most of us do try counting sheep at one time or another!